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While there may be an empty seat in the Vatican, here’s one pope that would never quit on you, thhhheeeeeeeee Spacepope! (Hey, Futurama Season 7 is now streaming on Netflix! Glory be to all powerful atheizmo!)

While there may be an empty seat in the Vatican, here’s one pope that would never quit on you, thhhheeeeeeeee Spacepope! (Hey, Futurama Season 7 is now streaming on Netflix! Glory be to all powerful atheizmo!)

Pope Benedict XVI Says He Will Resign →

Pope Benedict XVI, 85, the former Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger who took office in 2005, said on Monday that he will retire Feb. 28, the first pope to do so in six centuries, citing deteriorating health.

Alternate headline: World’s leading molester underground railroad advocate steps down.

Source : The New York Times

Evangelism’s secret history of racial discrimination - Salon.com →

[W]hat galvanized the Christian community was not abortion, school prayer, or the ERA [Equal Rights Amendment]. I am living witness to that because I was trying to get those people interested in those issues and I utterly failed.

What changed their minds was Jimmy Carter’s intervention against the Christian schools, trying to deny them tax-exempt status on the basis of so-called de facto segregation. In other words, as Randall Balmer has succinctly put it: “the religious right of the late twentieth century organized to perpetuate racial discrimination.”

Salon shows the history of how the political arm of Evangelical Christianity, as you might have suspected, is nothing but a veil for racists to try to push segregation and keep minorities oppressed.


LIBBY PHELPS ALVEREZ ALSO QUITS WESTBORO BAPTIST CHURCH.

Sounds like the younger generation organized a bit of a coup.

EDIT: OK, I jumped the gun. This woman left the church years ago.

We know that we’ve done and said things that hurt people. Inflicting pain on others wasn’t the goal, but it was one of the outcomes. We wish it weren’t so, and regret that hurt.

We know that we can’t undo our whole lives. We can’t even say we’d want to if we could; we are who we are because of all the experiences that brought us to this point. What we can do is try to find a better way to live from here on. That’s our focus.

Megan Phelps-Roper, formerly of the Westboro Baptist Church, in a blog post yesterday, February 6th, announcing that she and her sister Grace are leaving the controversial "God Hates Fags" church. You may have interacted with Megan Phelps-Roper on twitter or other social media networks as she was their internet outreach representative. It’s for that reason, I suppose, that it’s not too surprising she, apparently, overcame her ignorance. She was just surrounded by too much information.

SOURCE

She loved her son, but thought he would be better off in heaven

Universal Truth

If you’re looking for atheists talking about philosophy and other ideas concerning atheism on tumblr, search the tag “atheism” or “atheist.”

If you’re looking for some dumb assholes going on about what horrible, militant or hate-filled people we must be and how atheists should be forced out of America, search the tumblr tag “athiest” or “athieism”

Reverend Terry Greer, Pastor Charged With Killing Wife →

For years, Greer, 53, seemed to be a model pastor. He landed a prime job with one of north Alabama’s largest United Methodist congregations. Colleagues praised him as a preacher. Congregants called his marriage to wife Lisa loving.

But health problems forced him from the pulpit, and he was haunted by what his lawyer calls personal, psychological and professional struggles.

Now, friends and colleagues are struggling to understand how Greer ended up charged with killing his wife and wounding their daughter during a shooting in their church-owned home Jan. 10.


On the Media: The Church of Scientology has been notoriously unwelcoming of investigation into its inner workings, but Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright has just released a new book that delves deep into the history and practices of the Church, including its hostility toward reporters and strong ties with Hollywood. Bob Garfield talks to Wright about his book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, & the Prison of Belief.

On The Media: The Church of Scientology has been notoriously unwelcoming of investigation into its inner workings, but Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright has just released a new book that delves deep into the history and practices of the Church, including its hostility toward reporters and strong ties with Hollywood. Bob Garfield talks to Wright about his book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, & the Prison of Belief.


Losing Our Religion: The Growth Of The ‘Nones’

According to Harvard professor Robert Putnam, who writes about religion, this young generation has been distancing itself from community institutions and from institutions in general.
"They’re the same people who are also not joining the Elks Club or the Rotary Club," Putnam tells Greene. "I don’t mean to be casting that as a critique of them, but this same younger generation is much less involved in many of the main institutions of our society than previous younger generations were."
The trend, Putnam says, is borne out of rebellion of sorts.
"It begins to jump at around 1990," he says. "These were the kids who were coming of age in the America of the culture wars, in the America in which religion publicly became associated with a particular brand of politics, and so I think the single most important reason for the rise of the unknowns is that combination of the younger people moving to the left on social issues and the most visible religious leaders moving to the right on that same issue."

Losing Our Religion: The Growth Of The ‘Nones’

According to Harvard professor Robert Putnam, who writes about religion, this young generation has been distancing itself from community institutions and from institutions in general.

"They’re the same people who are also not joining the Elks Club or the Rotary Club," Putnam tells Greene. "I don’t mean to be casting that as a critique of them, but this same younger generation is much less involved in many of the main institutions of our society than previous younger generations were."

The trend, Putnam says, is borne out of rebellion of sorts.

"It begins to jump at around 1990," he says. "These were the kids who were coming of age in the America of the culture wars, in the America in which religion publicly became associated with a particular brand of politics, and so I think the single most important reason for the rise of the unknowns is that combination of the younger people moving to the left on social issues and the most visible religious leaders moving to the right on that same issue."